Not that there aren’t moments of joy now and than, and not that we don’t love our family members, but it’s just that often we are going through the motions in our lives, doing what is expected of us and not necessarily expecting it to be particularly rewarding or exciting.In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus tells his followers that he is about to leave them, but not entirely. “I will not leave you orphans; I will come to you,” Jesus says. “In a little while the world will no longer see me, but you will see me, because I live and you will live. On that day you will realize that I am in my Father and you are in me and I in you.”That last phrase has been sticking in my head: “On that day you will realize that I am in my Father and you are in me and I in you.” That seems like an awesome realization — one that I have glimpsed or touched but one that I have trouble fully embracing. It seems to me that Jesus is talking about an experience of God’s presence and love that will bring us the joy and peace of God, and that will allow us to cast off all cares and concerns that we tend to dwell on.Jesus says that he will live in each of us. The challenge for you and I is to be aware of and in touch with his presence on a regular basis.I guess “that day” hasn’t quite happened for me yet. Although I will say I find God increasingly present in my life in a positive way, I still revert to living by routine more than I live by faith. I work. I take care of my family. I spend time with my friends. I take vacations, go out to dinner, exercise and otherwise take care of myself. But I don’t always do so consciously and joyfully. Jesus promises that we will see him when others can’t. We may not see him physically, but we will be aware of his presence with us and his union with God the Father. It is a rich promise — one that suggests our lives can be filled with joy and free from fear. He says that he will live in each of us. The challenge for you and I is to be aware of and in touch with his presence on a regular basis. It would seem there is no reason for us to bemoan our lives — whether at work or at home. We may need to perform mundane tasks, but we don’t need to be mundane people. We are promised so much more than that if we can only recognize Christ’s presence inside us.Bill Peatman writes from Napa. He may be reached at [email protected]